Schedule for World Fantasy Convention 2018

I’m going to be at World Fantasy Con this coming weekend! This is my first World Fantasy Con, so I’m super excited to be attending. Thus far, it’s been a very positive experience and the programming committee has been very kind and bent over backwards to find a place for me.

I’m taking the train for the first time ever and if everything runs on time, I’ll be arriving at the hotel sometime between 6:30 and 7:00 p.m. on Thursday. I will be tired and ravenous but don’t let that scare you. Actually, it should frighten you just a little; however, I usually settle down once I’ve made it to my room and have been fed and watered.

Depending on my energy level, I’m hoping to get signed in and hang out for a bit Thursday evening.

On Friday morning, I have a breakfast meeting with my agent. After that, I have nothing else planned, so I’ll be hanging out at the con and attending panels. Saturday morning is currently free, as well.

If I’m just hanging out in the lobby with some free time, I’ll shoot a quick tweet.

Saturday 4:00 p.m., I’ll be on the Monsters and the Monstrous panel along with Julie C. Day, Aliette de Bodard, Hannah Strom-Martin (M), and John Wiswell.

Description: Monsters have existed as long as humans have made myths. But what makes a monster truly horrifying? A look at the lines between myth, horror, privilege, class, gender, and more.

I do have a planned Saturday evening dinner, and then I will have to leave very early Sunday morning, so I can be back in North Carolina for my day job on Monday.

A few notes for folks who haven’t met me:

I’m deaf, but I have a cochlear implant in my right ear. This means that if you approach me from behind or from my left, I might not hear you speak. If you say something to me and I don’t acknowledge you, it’s okay to touch my shoulder or arm to get my attention.

When we do speak, it might take me a moment or two to fully understand you, especially if you’re soft-spoken or if you have an accent. This is because of the way I hear through the implant. It usually only takes me a few moments before my brain begins to connect the sound coming from your mouth as words and when it does, we should be able to communicate without a problem.

In large crowds with lots of ambient noise, I’ll resort to lip-reading to supplement the sound coming in through my processor. This means I may frown a lot while I’m listening to you. It doesn’t mean I disagree with you, it’s just my listening face, because concentration.

If you see me reach for a small remote, I’m adjusting my microphones to shut out background noise. This helps me focus on the person in front of me.

Some of you might know sign language. I don’t. I do occasionally find it helpful, but at other times, it can confuse me even more, because my brain is hearing you through the implant and I’m lip-reading, so the added stimulation of attempting to translate hand movements can cause me to short-circuit. Trust me when I say it’s me, not you.

I don’t expect anyone to remember all of this, and I’m fine with letting people know what’s going on over and over if necessary.

I’m looking forward to a great con and meeting a lot of my online friends in real life. Be safe in your travels and I hope to see you there.